Agenda and minutes

Contact: Mr Henry Downey, Democratic Services Officer  028 9027 0550

Items
No. Item

1.

Apologies

Minutes:

          No apologies were reported.

 

2.

Minutes

Minutes:

            The minutes of the meeting of 23rd April were taken as read and signed as correct.  It was reported that those minutes had been adopted by the Council at its meeting on 4th May, subject to the omission of those matters in respect of which the Council had delegated its powers to the Committee.

 

3.

Declarations of Interest

Minutes:

            The High Sheriff (Councillor Long) declared an interest in respect of items 3d – 10 Per Cent Pay Increase for Council Workers, on the basis that the response from HM Treasury made reference to the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration, which was relevant to his profession, and left the meeting whilst that item was being discussed.

 

4.

Restricted Items

Minutes:

            The information contained in the reports associated with the following two items is restricted in accordance with Part 1 of Schedule 6 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 2014.

 

      Resolved – That the Committee agrees to exclude the members of the Press and public from the meeting during discussion of these items as, due to the nature of the items, there would be a disclosure of exempt information as described in Section 42(4) and Section 6 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 2014.

 

5.

UK Community Renewal Fund and Levelling Up Fund

Minutes:

            The Director of City and Organisational Strategy reminded the Members that the Government had, in its Budget in March, as part of its commitment to “levelling up” prosperity across the United Kingdom, announced a number of investment funds.

 

            He submitted for, their consideration, a report which provided details of two of funds which were of particular relevance to the Council, namely, the Community Renewal Fund and the Levelling Up Fund and set out the Council’s approach and bidding plans in relation to them.

 

            He provided information on the level of funding which Northern Ireland was likely to receive under the Community Renewal Fund and pointed out that support would be available for investment in skills, local businesses, community and place and/or supporting people into employment. Officers were currently preparing funding bids around skills development for the green economy, information technology and digital transformation for small businesses, details of which would be presented to the Committee ahead of the formal submission of an application by 18th June. Discussions were also taking place with SOLACE and with other councils to determine if a collaborative bid was possible ahead of the application deadline, with adjustments to be made, if required, to prevent duplication.

 

            He highlighted the fact that officers had explored the potential for submitting bids in the investment in communities and place category, however, no projects were sufficiently advanced to allow for a submission by the deadline date. Funding for projects in this category could, he pointed out, be explored through other funding opportunities.

 

            The Director of City and Organisational Strategy went on to provide details of the Levelling Up Fund, which would allow for investment in infrastructure, local transport and cultural and heritage assets which would have a visible effect on people and communities. He confirmed that the themes for the first three rounds of funding would focus upon investment in transportation, regeneration and town centres and culture and outlined a number of challenges being faced by the Council for round one, primarily around the submission of applications, the challenging timeframe, the funding allocation and the need for clarity around the eligibility for future rounds.


 

 

            He recommended that the Members of the Committee:

 

                             i          note the contents of the report;

 

                            ii          endorse the three Community Renewal Fund bid proposals, as outlined, and agree that they be moved forward to application stage for submission by 18th June, 2021;

 

                           iii          grant approval for officers to adjust the number and scope of proposed Community Renewal Fund bids, should discussions with other councils on collaborative bid(s) provide the opportunity to provide improved outcomes for Belfast citizens; and

 

                          iv          agree that officers continue the development work to prepare suitable bid(s) for future bidding rounds of the Levelling Up Fund and that the Council does not submit a bid under Round 1 of the Levelling Up Fund, in light of the considerations which he had outlined.   

 

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive  ...  view the full minutes text for item 5.

6.

UNESCO City of Music

Minutes:

(Ms. E. Henry, Senior Manager, Culture and Tourism, attended in connection with this item.)

 

            The Senior Manager, Culture and Tourism informed the Members of the Committee that, in order to become a Member of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, candidate cities were required to submit a detailed application outlining clearly their willingness, commitment and capacity to contribute towards the objectives of the Network. The Network covered seven creative fields, namely, Crafts and Folk Art, Design, Film, Gastronomy, Literature, Media Arts and Music.

 

            She reported that, following an initial scoping exercise and assessment against the criteria, it had been agreed that music represented the most appropriation designation for Belfast and referred to the ten-year cultural strategy ‘A City Imagining’, which included a commitment to bid for UNESCO City of Music status by 2021.

 

            She explained that the strategy sought to recognise the transformative power of music for individuals, communities and the City as a whole and referred to the positive results of an economic impact assessment of the cultural and creative industries and the music sector on Gross Value Added, employment and job creation.

 

            The Senior Manager, Culture and Tourism, reported further that a City of Music Steering Group, with representation from different sectors and genres, had been formed to design and implement the process, in conjunction with the Council, and she reviewed the wider engagement which had taken place to date. In addition to setting out the detail on the City’s sustainable agenda and details on the creative profile of the City, the application for City of Music status also included a commitment to deliver six cross-cutting initiatives, focusing on the themes of City Development, Creativity and Learning, Inclusion and Access and Sustainability and Environmental Responsibility. She provided an overview of three initiatives which would be delivered at a local level and of three internationally and outlined the next steps in the process, which would lead ultimately to the submission of an application to UNESCO by 30th June, 2021. 

 

            She then provided a breakdown of the annual programme and one-off project funding requirements which, in terms of the Council, would total £650,000 and confirmed that provision had been made within the current Departmental budget and estimates for future years.

 

            After discussion, the Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to note the contents of the report and approve the allocation of funding to support the initiatives set out within the application for City of Music status.   

 

7.

Matters referred back from Council/Motions

Minutes:

            (The Members of the Committee agreed, given that the following three reports were closely linked, to consider them simultaneously.)

 

8.

Motion - Statue of Mary Ann McCracken pdf icon PDF 295 KB

Minutes:

            The Committee was reminded that, at the Council meeting on 4th May, the following motion had been proposed by The High Sheriff (Councillor Long) and seconded by Councillor Nicholl:

 

“This Council resolves to install a statue of Mary Ann McCracken in the grounds of the City Hall.”

 

            The High Sheriff explained that Mary Ann McCracken was a Presbyterian, a member of the United Irishmen and eminent business woman who was renowned for her work on women’s rights, child education and living conditions, prison reform and the anti-slavery movement in the City, as well as her promotion of traditional music. 

 

            He pointed out that the grounds of the City Hall were not reflective of modern day Belfast, in terms of recognising women and those from a nationalist/republican background, and highlighted the need to address this imbalance, in the context of the recommendations resulting from the Equality Impact Assessment which had, in 2012, been undertaken in relation to the City Hall and the City Hall Grounds.

 

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to adopt the motion and that it be considered further in the report later in the meeting on installations in the City Hall/City Hall Grounds.

 

9.

Installations - City Hall/City Hall Grounds pdf icon PDF 150 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0      Purpose of Report or Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1       In November 2012, the Council received an independent Equality Impact Assessment (EQIA) relating to the City Hall and City Hall grounds.  This EQIA was carried out in accordance with Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 and the Council’s Equality Scheme.  This EQIA underpinned the decision to relocate memorabilia into the exhibition, allowing it to be seen and understood in a different way.  Whilst the relocation of the artefacts and memorabilia from various parts of the City Hall into the exhibition space addressed the issue of the City Hall itself, in terms of the EQIA, the EQIA also applied to the City Hall grounds, in respect of which no steps have been taken to address the report’s findings that there is a need to provide a contemporary image of the City, reflective of its vibrancy and diversity.

 

            The purpose of this report is to seek approval on a number of issues related to installations and future installations in City Hall and City Hall grounds.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

                                            i     approve the installation of a statue of Winifred Carney, the final form of this statue to be brought back to Committee for approval, as part of the Capital Programme (approval is being sought through the Physical Programme paper to move this to Stage 2 under the Capital Programme);

 

                                          ii     approve the installation of a plaque commemorating Sir Edward Carson and the signing of the Ulster Covenant;

 

                                         iii     establish a Member Working Group to consider and agree commissions for future installations in City Hall or City Hall grounds; and

 

                                         iv     note the ongoing discussions in respect of statues in the City Hall grounds and the development of a contemporary installation styled as a community arc.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Discussions have been ongoing at Party Group Leader level in relation to the installation of additional statues within City Hall grounds.  This is in the context of the EQIA referred to in the introduction to this report and the need to achieve a greater level of balance in terms of the persons who are depicted or represented within the grounds.  One such figure promoted as being a person of significant historical importance, viewed by many as worthy of being commemorated, is Winifred Carney.  In the context of the EQIA and not in any way to undermine her historical importance, Winifred Carney goes some way to providing the balance that the EQIA recommends.  She does so as a woman, as a Trade Unionist representing workers and as an Irish Nationalist and Republican.  Notably she was married to George McBride, a prominent member of the UVF.  At Party Group Leaders there was some discussion as to whether this relationship needed to be covered in terms of the statue or  ...  view the full minutes text for item 9.

10.

Update on Physical Programme pdf icon PDF 530 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0      Purpose of Report/Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1             The Council’s Physical Programme covers 170 current capital projects under a range of internal and external funding streams, together with projects which the Council delivers on behalf of external agencies. The Capital Programme forms part of the Physical Programme and is a rolling programme of investment which either improves existing Council facilities or provides new facilities. The purpose of this report is to seek approval for Stage movements on the Capital Programme.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

·        City Hall Statues - Move ‘City Hall Statues - Winifred Carney’ to Stage 2 – Uncommitted on the Capital Programme; and

 

·        City Cemetery Project - note the update provided on the appointment of a mapping and genealogy software specialist.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Members will be aware that the Council runs a substantial physical programme under a range of funding streams including the capital programme, BIF and LIF together with the projects that it is delivering on behalf of other agencies including the Executive Office, the Department for Communities and Department for Infrastructure. There are currently 170 live projects worth in excess of £120m, as well as 100+ early stage uncommitted projects and £300m + of completed projects which still receive dedicated resourcing effort.

 

            Proposed Movement - Capital Programme 

 

3.2       Members agreed that all capital projects must go through a three-stage process where decisions on which capital projects progress are taken by the Committee. This provides assurance as to the level of financial control and will allow Members to properly consider the opportunity costs of approving one capital project over another capital project. Members are asked to agree to the following movements on the Capital Programme:

 

Project

Overview

Stage

City Hall Statues – Winifred Carney

The creation of new statues within the grounds of City Hall. One of the pieces is to be a representation of Winifred Carney

.

Move to Stage 2 – Uncommitted

 

            Members will be aware that the overarching City Hall Statues project was approved at SP&R Committee in January 2020 as a Stage 1 - Emerging project on the Capital Programme. Members are asked to recommend that one element of the statues, Winifred Carney, is moved to Stage 2 – Uncommitted on the Capital Programme.  Further detail on this is contained with the ‘Installations – City Hall/City Hall Grounds’ report which is also on the agenda for discussion by the Committee at its meeting on 21st May. An Outline Business Case (OBC) will now be worked up on the proposal with further detail to be brought back to Committee in due course.

 

3.3       City Cemetery Project – Mapping and Genealogy Software Specialist

 

            Members will be aware that the City Cemetery project was approved at the SP and R Committee  ...  view the full minutes text for item 10.

11.

Motion - War Years Remembered pdf icon PDF 303 KB

Minutes:

            The Committee was reminded that, at the Council meeting on 4th May, the following motion had been proposed by Councillor Pankhurst and seconded by Alderman Copeland:

 

“This Council notes the priceless and globally renowned work of War Years Remembered, as well as the impact which COVID-19 has had on the museum.

 

Consequently, given the importance of not only preserving our social and military history as well as offering educational lessons that offer excellent ways of building bridges between communities, including ethnic minorities, this Council agrees to engage with War Years Remembered on finding a suitable solution to their current struggles, including a proposed relocation to Belfast.

 

This Council agrees that such a move would be beneficial not only to our city’s economy and attractiveness through local tourism, but also through the provision of education to our schools, colleges and local community groups.”

 

            In accordance with Standing Order 13(f), the motion had been referred without discussion to the Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.

 

            Councillor Pankhurst provided details of the various historical artefacts contained within the War Years Remembered Museum and pointed out that some of those had been placed on display at the event which had taken place on 15th April in the City Hall grounds to mark the 80th anniversary of the Belfast Blitz. He explained that the owner was experiencing a number of challenges around the operation of the museum and that he was seeking to relocate it from a warehouse several miles away into Belfast. He highlighted the significant benefits which such a move would bring, in terms of raising awareness, attracting visitors and supporting the economy and urged the Members of the Committee to grant approval for Council officers to enter into discussions with the owner on the future of the museum.

 

Alderman Kingston then spoke in favour of the proposal.

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to submit to a future meeting a report on the outcome of those discussions.

 

12.

Motion - Proposed Bank of Ireland Closures - Response from Managing Director Northern Ireland pdf icon PDF 427 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee was reminded that the Council, at its meeting on 1st April, had passed the following motion, which had been proposed by Councillor McAteer and seconded by Councillor Gormley:

 

“This Council:

 

·        notes the plans announced by Bank of Ireland to close 103 branches across the island of Ireland, including three in South Belfast;

 

·        notes the expectation set by the Financial Conduct Authority that banks should assess customer needs and consider the availability and provision of alternative arrangements where closures are planned;

 

·        notes the concern expressed by the Financial Conduct Authority that it may be more difficult than usual to reach all customers under the current restrictions and engage with them on closure proposals effectively;

 

·        supports the call from the Financial Services Union that there should be no closures of branches during the pandemic and its call for a moratorium on closures until the end of 2022; and

 

·        agrees to write to the CEO of Bank of Ireland to call for such a moratorium.”

 

            The City Solicitor informed the Members that a response to the motion had been received from Mr. I. Sheppard, Managing Director, Bank of Ireland Northern Ireland.

 

            Mr. Sheppard stated that he understood the concerns which had been expressed around the proposed branch closures and stressed that the decision had not been taken lightly. He explained that Bank of Ireland had undertaken a thorough analysis of its services, including branch usage, the growth in online banking and the range of services which it could offer through the Post Office network, and had highlighted the fact that 52% of counter services provided to Bank of Ireland customers in Northern Ireland were already carried out at a local Post Office.

 

            He pointed out that the trend towards digital banking had been evident for more than a decade and had been accelerating since 2017. Given the clear changes being seen in customer behaviour, Bank of Ireland was not, therefore, in a position to change its approach in relation to branch closures.

 

            He explained that the bank was committed to ensuring that customers were fully informed of the alternative arrangements available to them and highlighted mobile, on line and telephone banking services, and the option to use remaining Bank of Ireland branches and the Post Office. Full details of these arrangements were contained in a letter and a branch impact analysis which had been sent to customers of those branches in Belfast which had been identified for closure. The branch impact analysis documents had also been published on the bank’s website.

 

            Mr. Sheppard referred to the fact that Bank of Ireland customers could, at their local Post Office, make lodgements of cash and cheques, withdraw cash and make balance enquiries. Business customers would, later this year, also be able to use nominated Post Office outlets to access enhanced services, such as cheque encashment, bulk cash lodgements and obtaining pre-ordered coinage. The bank would again be writing to its customers before and after each branch closed. In addition, branch teams would be  ...  view the full minutes text for item 12.

13.

Motion - 10 Per Cent Pay Increase for Council Workers – Response from HM Treasury pdf icon PDF 504 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Committee was reminded that the Council, at its meeting on 1st April, had passed the following motion, which had been proposed by Councillor Matt Collins and seconded by Councillor Michael Collins:

 

“Over the last year, councils have led the way in efforts against the Covid-19 pandemic, providing a huge range of services and support for our communities. Local Government has shown more than ever how indispensable it is.

 

But the pandemic has led to a massive increase in expenditure and loss of income and the Government has failed to provide the full amount of promised support.

 

Local Government workers have kept our communities safe throughout the pandemic, often putting themselves at considerable risk as they work to protect public health and deliver functioning services during this difficult time.

 

Since 2010, the local government workforce has endured years of pay restraint with the majority of pay points losing at least 23 per cent of their value since 2009/10. At the same time, workers have experienced ever-increasing workloads and persistent job insecurity.

 

The funding gap caused by Covid-19 will make local government employment even more precarious. There has been a disproportionate impact on women, with women making up more than three-quarters of the local government workforce.

 

Recent research shows that if the Westminster Government were to fully fund the unions’ 2021 pay claim, around half of the money would be recouped thanks to increased tax revenue, reduced expenditure on benefits, and increased consumer spending in the local economy.

 

The Council believes that:

 

·        our workers are public service super-heroes. They keep our communities clean and safe, look after those in need, and ensure services continue to function. Without the professionalism and dedication of our staff, the council services would not be deliverable. Local government workers deserve a proper real term pay increase; and

 

·        the Government should take responsibility to fully fund this increase, it should not put the burden on local authorities whose funding streams have greatly suffered and who have not been offered adequate support throughout the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

Therefore, the Council resolves to:

 

·        support the pay claim submitted by Trade Unions representing all public sector staff for a substantial increase;

 

·        to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer to call for a pay increase for public sector workers to be funded with new money from central government;

 

·        meet with local NJC union representatives to convey support for the pay claim and consider practical ways in which the Council can support the campaign; and

 

·        encourage all staff to join a union.”

 

            The City Solicitor drew the Members’ attention to a response to the motion which had been received from HM Treasury, on behalf of the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

 

            The response had stressed that the Government recognised that public sector workers played a vital role in the running of public services and referred to their commitment in keeping the public safe during the pandemic. It hugely valued and appreciated the dedication of all key workers and was working hard to ensure  ...  view the full minutes text for item 13.

14.

Motion - Support for Sign Languages Act and the Addition of Sign Languages to School Curricula - Response from Ministers pdf icon PDF 421 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Committee was reminded that the Council, at its meeting on 1st April, had passed the following motion, which had been proposed by Councillor McMullan and seconded by Councillor Heading:

 

“This Council notes that 15th – 21st March was Sign Language Week, timed with the anniversary of the UK Government formally recognising British Sign Language as a language in its own right on 18th March 2003. However, in 2021 neither British Sign Language nor Irish Sign Language have legal status in Northern Ireland nor are sign languages part of school curricula.

 

This means at present, that deaf people must rely on the provisions of the Disability Discrimination Act (NI) (1995) to secure reasonable adjustments via sign language provision. In order to do so, deaf people are required to identify as ‘disabled’, in sharp contrast to their right to recognition as a cultural and linguistic minority under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

 

This Council believes that there is a need to create a more accessible and inclusive society in Northern Ireland, through greater learning of sign languages and awareness of Deaf culture.

 

It further notes this Council’s previous support for the Belfast Statement on Mental Health and Deafness following the 6th World Congress, which met in Belfast in September 2014, to address issues around equal rights for deaf people in mental health care under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

Noting the rights of deaf people to recognition as a cultural and linguistic minority under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, this Council expresses its support for the introduction of a Sign Languages Act for Northern Ireland. Further noting Article 24(b) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities that requires the State to facilitate the learning of sign language and the promotion of the linguistic identity of the deaf community, the Council expresses its support for sign languages to be added to school curricula to ensure that all children learn from the earliest opportunity.

 

Therefore, the Council will write to the Minister for Communities and the Minister for Education to ask when the New Decade, New Approach commitment to a Sign Language Act will be brought forward and further asks that this legislation includes provision for sign languages to be added to the Key Stage 1 and 2 Curriculum, with schools equipped to deliver these courses, as well as the introduction of sign languages as a GCSE for secondary school pupils.”

 

            The City Solicitor informed the Members that a response to the motion has been received from Mr. P. Weir, Minister for Education, and from Mr. T. McAuley, Acting Head of Sign Language Policy Team, on behalf of the Minister for Communities.

 

            Minister Weir had stated that there was currently no statutory requirement for pupils to learn sign language in schools in Northern Ireland. However, young people should be given opportunities to engage with  ...  view the full minutes text for item 14.

15.

Belfast Agenda/Strategic Issues

16.

Update on Belfast Region City Deal pdf icon PDF 432 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0      Purpose of Report or Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1       This report provides Members with an update on the progress of the Belfast Region City Deal (BRCD), including an update on the development of Outline Business Cases (OBCs) and progress on the development and agreement of the Deal Documentation to allow phased delivery to commence.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

            The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

·        note the programme overview and the progress that has been made in Outline Business Cases (OBCs) development for all projects, as detailed in the appendix accompanying the report;

 

·        note the development of the deal document, based on the agreed approach to delivery of a phased deal; and

 

·        note the update in respect of the BRCD Council Panel and the minutes of the BRCD Council Panel held on 29th January 2021.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

            Programme Overview

 

3.1       In February, the Committee received a detailed update on progress across the programme and on the ongoing discussions between partners and the NI and UK Governments in relation to agreeing a phased deal, which recognises the varying states of readiness of projects across the programme. The NI Delivery Board, which oversees all the City and Growth Deals in NI has agreed this approach in principle, with approval of expenditure being sought for the most advanced projects in parallel with the deal document being developed. Members will be aware that the development and agreement of the deal document is critical to allow money to flow to the BRCD projects. 

 

            Deal Document

 

3.2       Over the past few months work has continued at pace and a draft Deal document has been developed based on content suggested by the UK Government in line with previous deals.  The PMO has reviewed a number of deal documents to ensure the language and level of detail within the BRCD document is consistent with previous deals.

 

3.3       It builds on the BRCD initial proposition and the Heads of Term document signed in March 2019.  However, the draft deal document also recognises that previous plans were agreed before the Covid-19 pandemic and therefore the programme and its projects have been reviewed in light of the new economic challenges and outlines how the proposals have proven to be essential to plans for the recovery of the region.

 

3.4       The overarching deal document is supported by both an Implementation Plan and Financial Plan, which both also have to be agreed by the partners with the NI and UK government departments.  These documents are also being developed as set out below.

 

3.5       The Implementation Plan provides detailed information on the projects including key milestones, financial information and funding flows, risks and outcomes.  This information is being collated from the OBCs through programme assurance work undertaken by KPMG and through engagement with Partners. It should be noted that Implementation Plan forms the basis  ...  view the full minutes text for item 16.

17.

Update on Customer Focus Programme pdf icon PDF 187 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Mrs. R. Crozier, Customer Focus Programme Director, attended in connection with this item.)

 

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0      Purpose of Report or Summary of Main Issues

 

            Members are reminded that, in February 2021, they received an update on the Customer Focus Programme which included plans for a new Customer Hub function to be operational from 29th March, 2021.

 

1.2       This report provides Committee with an update on:

 

·        the implementation of the Customer Hub; and

·        the development of an Elected Members’ mobile app and plans for roll out of the app to all Members.


 

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May 2021, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

1.      note the update on the implementation of the Customer Hub function;

 

2.      note the update on the development of a mobile application for Elected Members and plans to roll this out to all members starting in June 2021; and

 

3.      agree that Party Group briefings be held in June 2021 to obtain Members’ feedback on their Customer Hub experience and to promote use of the new mobile app.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

            Background

 

3.1       Our vision of customer focused services and associated blueprint for the Customer Hub were presented at the May 2020 Committee meeting and aim to ensure that we deliver:

 

·        Optimised customer contact – professionalising resources and providing modern digital and telephony systems with access to real time data on contact performance

 

·        Channel shift – moving where possible to digitally enabled self-serve solutions

 

·        Customer centricity – designing our services around the needs of our customers.

 

3.2       The Customer Hub blueprint remains as is, putting our customers at the heart of everything, ensuring we provide a consistent and professional service, affording our customers choice and convenience. This means improving and aligning all our access to service channels – telephone, face to face, website, and social media.

 

3.3       As part of this blueprint, the Customer Hub operation went live as planned on 29 March 2021. The Customer Hub operation consists of 16FTEs covering from 8 am to 6 pm, Monday to Friday, as a hybrid team working from Cecil Ward Building and from home, providing a first point of contact for a range of customers.

 

3.4       The first phase of this new function deals with customer contact for all departments and services, across a number of channels (online, telephone, email). Initially the hub will manage all customer contact for cleansing/waste and calls formerly through the main switchboard and corporate complaints numbers. All other direct dial telephone numbers remain unchanged.

 

3.5       As part of the blueprint for Elected Members, the Customer Hub provides specific services for Elected Members in the form of a direct phone line and email account and both these channels also went live on 29th March 2021.

 

            Implementation of the Customer Hub Function

 

3.6       Preparation for implementation of the Customer Hub intensified from January 2021 to March 2021,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 17.

18.

Update on Summer Programme pdf icon PDF 351 KB

Minutes:

(Mr. R. Black, Director of Neighbourhood Services attended in connection with this item.)

 

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report or Summary of main Issues

 

1.1       The purpose of this report is to update Members on our proposed summer programme for 2021, which will focus on services for children and young people, families and older people and support for partners and the CVSE sector.


 

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

·        note the planned citywide summer programme and that delivery remains contingent on the further relaxation of COVID restrictions by the NI Executive.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

            Key Issues

 

            Context

 

3.1       The ongoing NI Executive Covid 19 restrictions has resulted in a significant disruption to our services during Summer 2021. This disruption will affect the types of permissible activities, the maximum group numbers and the location of any programme offer to families, children and young people and older people.  Our service offer will also be limited by our ability to comply with child ratios within available staff resources and limited volunteer support.

 

3.2       C and NS has established an internal summer programming team, to design and plan activities and events, as we emerge from lockdown.  As restrictions are further eased we will review and amend our plans accordingly and in line with public health guidance.  The programme will support the further recovery of some of our facilities, such as community centres and our parks and open space.

 

3.3       Our programme has been designed in line with the recovery recommendations published by Prof Siobhan O’Neill (NI Mental Health Champion) and via collaborative working with the Belfast Area Outcomes Group for CYP, the Education Authority and Youth Services, the Greater Belfast Seniors Forum and key community and voluntary sector partners.  Prof O’Neill’s recommendations focus on:

 

-       Reconnecting and reducing social isolation;

-       Good quality programming;

-       Promotion and support of existing community provision;

-       Incorporation of physical activities, such as sports, dance, music & drama.

 

3.4       The BCC summer programme will focus on 4 key areas, namely:

 

-       Children and Young People

-       Families

-       Older People

-       Support For Partners & CVSE Sector

 

            Children and Young People:

 

3.5       The current pandemic has made it difficult to plan a summer scheme programme based on the changing guidelines surrounding social distancing measures, capacity of participant numbers and what activities and sports are permitted at certain times.

 

3.6       We plan to deliver a two-week summer play programme which will move across the city from 17th July – late August 2021.  This will operate with a capacity of 25 participants (related to child ratios) and we may also seek to allocate spaces via referrals from partners if necessary.

 

3.7       Given the fluid environment, we will maximise the use of our parks and outdoor space with fall back plans to use Community Centres when needed due to inclement weather  ...  view the full minutes text for item 18.

19.

Fairtrade in Belfast pdf icon PDF 638 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report

 

1.1       The purpose of this report is to invite Members to pass a resolution updating the Council’s support for the continued campaign to maintain Fairtrade City (Borough) status for the Belfast City Council area.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

            The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

·        Demonstrate continued support for Fairtrade by passing the following resolution:

 

            ‘This Council acknowledges the very real contribution that Fairtrade makes to sustainable development, tackling poverty, and to improving the lives of people from some of the most disadvantaged farming communities in the developing world.

 

            Welcoming the efforts of the UK Fairtrade Foundation, Fairtrade Ireland and the regional campaign, with Northern Ireland a Fairtrade devolved region, to raise awareness of the worldwide impact of unfair trade and the opportunities that Fairtrade provides to promote sustainable development, the Council resolves to provide civic leadership and active support for a campaign to maintain Fairtrade City/Borough status for Belfast City Council area.’

 

·        Nominate two Elected Members to the Fairtrade Steering Group, who will act as the Chair and Deputy Chair.

 

2.2       Towards this objective we will:

 

·        Seek to ensure that Fairtrade certified food and drink options are offered internally, in Council canteens and vending machines, 100% Fairtrade coffee and tea is available for all internal meetings; and included in procurement guidelines with subsequent annual review;

 

·        Work in partnership with the media, businesses and local communities to raise awareness of Fairtrade issues and the opportunities for supporting Fairtrade throughout the City;

 

·        Use our influence to encourage the increased availability and use of Fairtrade products locally, including during Council organized events, hospitality and festivals;

 

·        Encourage the active involvement of communities from across the City in the local Fairtrade Steering Group and campaign for Fairtrade status, including representatives from local schools, churches, businesses and charities;

 

·        Monitor progress on maintaining Fairtrade City/Borough status through production of an annual report; and

 

·        Appoint officer(s) from the Council as administrative support and nomination of two elected members to the Fairtrade Steering Group, who will act as Chair and Deputy Chair.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Fairtrade is a global movement for change that works to guarantee a better deal for disadvantaged producers in the developing world, securing better prices, decent working conditions and fair terms of trade. Its primary objective is to tackle poverty and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goals 2,5,8,12,13, 16 and 17 in the developing world.

 

3.2       Working through the concept of trade rather than aid, Fairtrade supports the development of thriving farming and worker communities and the protection of the environment in which they live and work.  Fairtrade tackles any use of child labour and/or human trafficking.

 

3.3       The Fairtrade system achieves a better deal for producers in the developing world, by offering them two major benefits: the ‘Fairtrade Minimum Price’, which is a guaranteed, minimum price paid by  ...  view the full minutes text for item 19.

20.

EU Exit - Proposed Economic Study and Briefing pdf icon PDF 178 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report/Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1       The purpose of this report is to set out the process and resource implications around a study on economic opportunities on the island of Ireland to be gained through new trading and economic relationships, following a request raised at the April 2021 meeting of the Council. 


 

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       If the Committee is minded to approve the study, the Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

                                            i     agree that officers work up terms of reference for approval by the Brexit Committee;

 

                                          ii     agree that officers bring back a costed proposal; and

 

                                        iii     agree that officers explore the potential for cost sharing with another statutory or academic body.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Members will be aware that, following the UK’s exit from the EU, there are new processes in place governing trading relationships between Northern Ireland and GB and Northern Ireland and the European Union.  The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) was approved in April and sets out a framework for the UK and EU’s future relationship.  It sets out arrangements in areas such as trade in goods and services (including financial and legal services), digital trade, intellectual property, public procurement, aviation and road transport, energy, fisheries, social security coordination and collaboration on scientific research and collaboration, thematic issues, health collaboration, participation in EU Programmes.

 

3.2       In addition to the TCA, under the NI Protocol arrangements, NI remains in the EU's single market for goods.  This allows goods to flow to and from NI to ROI and the rest of the EU without customs checks, tariffs or new paperwork.  The EU's rules on customs and regulation of agri-food products continues to apply to goods arriving in NI.  The Protocol covers a wide range of areas: human rights, the Common Travel Area, the Single Electricity Market, limited state aid provisions, regulation of manufactured goods and VAT and excise.

 

3.3       Invest NI has set out its position for trade and investment, noting that Northern Ireland continues to have access to the Great Britain (GB) and the EU markets for goods and that ‘this dual market access position means that Northern Ireland can become a gateway for the sale of goods to two of the world’s largest markets and the only place where businesses can operate free from customs declarations, rules of origin certificates and non-tariff barriers on the sale of goods to both GB and the EU’.

 

3.4       The implementation of the new trading relationships has clearly brought challenges.  In April 2021, QUB released the results of an opinion poll undertaken on their behalf which demonstrated that public views are evenly split over whether the protocol is overall positive for Northern Ireland (43%; 44% disagree) although 65% of respondents acknowledged that particular arrangements for Northern Ireland are necessary to manage Brexit.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 20.

21.

Physical Programme and Asset Management

22.

Update on Phase 5 of the Alleygates Programme pdf icon PDF 157 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            (Mr. R. Black, Director of Neighbourhood Services attended in connection with this item.)

 

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report or Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1       The purpose of this report is to provide Members with a further update on the next steps associated with Phase 5 of the Alleygates Programme.

 

2.0       Recommendation

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to approve the agreed approach for Phase 5.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Members will recall that, at the Committee meeting on 19th March, an update on Phase 5 Alleygates was provided and the decision was taken to allocate the £500K capital budget equally across North, South, East and West Belfast.

 

3.2       Additionally, Members were informed that a framework would be developed to assist Members in prioritising potential gate locations for Alleygates Phase 5.

 

3.3       Officers have reviewed frameworks used for previous phases of Alleygates and, having taken on board Members feedback, are suggesting the following 6 stage approach:

 

3.4       Initial Data Analysis

 

-       Crime/ASB Data (PSNI/Council)

-       Environmental Crime Data (Council)

-       Registered Elected Member requests for Alleygates (Council)

-       Customer requests for Alleygates (Council)

-       Site Suitability for alleygates (including meeting definition of alleyway as per legislation as can’t close off public footpaths)

 

3.5       The analysis will produce an ‘initial priority list’ of possible alleygate locations for future Committee consideration on an area basis (North, South, East and West).  Alleygate locations ranking of high need in more than one of the categories above will likely be ranked higher as these are indicators of demonstrating stronger need/suitability.

 

            Elected Member Assessment

 

3.6       Recognising that statistical data does not always present the fullest and most accurate analysis of need, formal Elected Member input will be sought via pro forma to enrich the data analysis.

 

3.7       The pro forma will include items such as:

 

-       Member knowledge of history of crime, ASB, environmental crime and gate effectiveness

-       Overview of any community consultation/feedback completed by Members

-       Identification of any other locations, assessed against suitability criteria

 

            Agreed Long List

 

3.8       The initial data analysis and formal Elected Member assessment will be combined, producing a citywide ‘long list’ (presented on an area basis) and this will be presented to Strategic Policy and Resources Committee for formal consideration.

 

            Area Allocation

 

3.9       Following agreement of the citywide ‘long list’, possible gate locations for each area will be considered by the appropriate Area Working Group.  The Area Working Group will be asked to refine that list to an agreed priority short list based on available data and budget (£125K per area).

 

3.10     Area Working Groups will also be asked to consider agreeing a reserve list (in priority order) of possible gate locations as based on previous experience.  This is because there are a range of reasons (community objection, further site suitability issues, statutory objection) which sometimes prevent alleygates from proceeding  ...  view the full minutes text for item 22.

23.

Asset Management pdf icon PDF 280 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

i)       Hannahstown Hill Village Playground and Public Square

 

-        extend the current Licence Agreement with Hannahstown Community Association for a further ten years;

 

ii)     DfC Covid 19 Revitalisation Scheme – Legal agreements

 

-        enter into legal agreements with DfI and DfC in respect to the revitalisation schemes at Castle Place and Adelaide Street;

 

iii)   Forth Meadow Community Greenway – Licence Agreements

 

-        enter into Licence Agreements on third party lands, as required, to facilitate the completion of the capital project;

 

iv)    Conacre / Grazing Agreements

 

-        approve conacre licences for the growing of crops, grazing and grass cutting on agricultural lands for a period of three years on Council lands at Cavehill Country Park, Glencairn, Lagan Meadows, Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park, Barnett’s Demesne, Clement Wilson Park, Ballygomartin Road (North and South), Lagan Lands East and Roselawn; and

 

v)     Covid-19 Testing Sites

 

-        approve the lease between the Council and the Department of Health and Social Care at Woodlands Playing Fields Car Park for a  Local Testing Facility/Walk-In Centre for Covid-19 and the extension of the Access Agreement between the Council and Serco Ltd for Mobile Testing Units at Whiterock Leisure Centre and Northumberland Street Car Parks.

 

24.

Update on Area Working Groups pdf icon PDF 304 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to approve and adopt the minutes of the meeting of the East Belfast Area Working Group of 6th May, including the following recommendations:

 

                                       i          that £40,000 of the allocated BIF funding be released to the Strand Arts Centre to progress with RIBA Stage 2 but that no further funding be released for RIBA Stage 3;

 

                                      ii          that the Strand Arts Centre be required to provide up-to-date costings for the project as part of the Strand RIBA Stage 2 report;

 

                                    iii          that both the Strand Arts Centre and the Titanic People projects be timebound, with a definitive timeline to be communicated to the groups via letter, and, if projects were to progress, that stages within the projects would also be timebound against key project deliverables, and;

 

                                    iv          that a meeting be convened in October in order to review each project’s progress against the timelines and to make decisions on any future commitments.

 

25.

Finance, Procurement and Performance

26.

Update on Contracts pdf icon PDF 166 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

·        approve the public advertisement of tenders, in line with Standing Order 37a, as detailed in Table 1 below;

 

·        approve the award of Single Tender Actions, in line with Standing Order 55 exceptions, as detailed in Table 2 below; and

 

·        note the award of retrospective Single Tender Actions, in line with Standard Order 55 exceptions, as detailed in Table 3 below.

 

Table 1: Competitive Tenders

 

Title of Tender

Proposed Contract Duration

Estimated Total Contract Value

SRO

Short description of goods / services

Microsoft Enterprise Subscription Agreement (ESA)

Up to 3 years

£1,500,000

R Cregan

Microsoft Enterprise Subscription Agreement (ESA) is the contract to provide all or our Microsoft services such as Office 365.

T2167 Management and coordination/referrals of service provision for the Traveller Communities. (fully funded)

Up to 19 months

£66,000

S Toland / R Black

Approved by SP&R April 2021.  Further approval sought for an increase in Contract duration. To develop and enhance infrastructure that enables a coordinated approach in accessing services and service delivery for the Travelling Community in Belfast.

Provision of production management for Council events and activities

Up to 4 years

£350,000

A Reid

Tender required for the provision of a production management service for Council events and activities.

Development of economic strategy for Belfast

Up to 5 months

£80,000

A Reid

Position Belfast and Council in context of emerging regional strategy positions

T2082 Provision of a ‘Youth Engagement and Civic Education Project’ for Forth Meadow Community Greenway PEACE IV Programme Services

Up to 16 months

£80,000

S Toland / R Black

Approved by SP&R June 2020, project delayed due to covid - EU Funded project to engage with 600 young people along the Forth Meadow Community Greenway

Property Maintenance Units MTC for building energy management systems maintenance

Up to 4 years

£250,000

S Grimes

Recurring contract which covers callouts, repairs, planned maintenance and small works to building energy management systems to all Council properties

Property Maintenance Units MTC for CCTV, door access and public address systems maintenance

Up to 4 years

£250,000

S Grimes

Recurring contract which covers callouts, repairs, planned maintenance and small works to CCTV, door access and public address systems to all Council properties

Property Maintenance Units MTC for fire and intruder alarms maintenance

Up to 4 years

£350,000

S Grimes

Recurring contract which covers callouts, repairs, planned maintenance and small works to fire and intruder alarms systems to all Council Properties

Property Maintenance Units MTC for lifts maintenance

up to 5 years

£375,000

S Grimes

Recurring contract which covers callouts, repairs, planned maintenance and small works to lifts to all Council properties

Replacement metal railings at Dundonald Cemetery

Up to 16 weeks

£60,000

S Grimes

Works identified in Property Maintenance Units 2021/22 – non-recurring

Refurbishment of entrance gates at Ormeau Park 

Up to 12 weeks

£30,000

S Grimes

Works identified in Property Maintenance Units  ...  view the full minutes text for item 26.

27.

Equality and Good Relations

28.

Update on Decade of Centenaries Programme pdf icon PDF 154 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report or Summary of Main Issues

 

1.1            The purpose of this report is to update Members on the current Decade of Centenaries programme and to seek approval from Members to apply for additional funding that has become available from the Northern Ireland Office.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

                                         i        note the contents of this report and progress in the delivery of this year’s Decade of Centenaries programme; and

 

                                       ii        agree the proposal to apply to the NIO’s Centenary Programme for £4,000 to deliver an Arts project, as part of marking the centenary of Northern Ireland, ‘Our Story in the Making: NI Beyond 100’.


 

 

3.0       Main Report

 

3.1       Members will be aware that there are a number of projects being delivered as part of the Decade of Centenaries Programme this year. In addition to a range of Council funded activities, the Council has received funding from the Shared History Fund (administered by Heritage Lottery on behalf of the NIO) to deliver a number of projects.  These projects are:

 

-       Drama and animation programme on 22 June 2021 and live performances in the Autumn to schools and youth groups

-       The restoration of the chairs in the Council Chamber, used by the King and Queen on the occasion of the inauguration of the NI Parliament in 1921

-       A digitised artefacts and stories projects related to 1921 to be launched at a live event in Autumn 2021

-       A time capsule project with young people

-       End of Decade of Centenaries Conference in March 2022

 

3.2       In addition to these events, others have also already been delivered or being planned, which are funded or supported by the Council, including:

 

-       A programme of 37 online events for the Civic Weekend 1-3 May

-       Illumination of the façade of City Hall on 22 June 2021

-       An online conference on Violence, Conflict, Militarisation and Displacement; Belfast in 1920

-       An online panel discussion on ‘100 years of Northern Ireland; how has it gone?’

-       Cycle 100 events

-       Discussion events in the autumn

 

3.3       An additional opportunity has now become available. The NIO is offering funding of up to £4,000 for each council to commission an artist, community group, or group of young artists local to the area, to create and develop a cultural piece of work - be that a piece of art or the development of a community space - that reflects the unique community of each council area.

 

3.4       The project is not required to have a centenary narrative, but instead should capture a moment in time for the community. Proposals are required to be submitted by councils to NIO by 1st June 2021 and the cultural piece is to be completed by 31st August 2021.

 

3.5       In order to ensure an open  ...  view the full minutes text for item 28.

29.

Request for Funding – Polish Heritage Flight Visit pdf icon PDF 245 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee considered the following report:

 

“1.0     Purpose of Report/Summary of Main Issues

1.1       The purpose of this report is to advise Members of a request for funding towards a Polish Heritage Flight Visit due to take place in August, 2021.

 

2.0       Recommendations

 

2.1       The Members of the Committee are asked to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to:

 

                                            i     approve an amount of £3,000 towards the Polish Heritage Trail as part of the partnership approach with Our Freedom and Yours, the Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Belfast, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough, Ards and North Down Borough and Lisburn and Castlereagh City Councils;

 

                                          ii     approve an additional £800 towards the educational element,  subject to liaison with the relevant Good Relations Officer to ensure that the sessions are targeted at wide audience and the content fits with good relations objectives; and

 

                                        iii     note that the above funding support is subject to confirmation being received from The Executive Office on their allocation towards the District Council Good Relations Programme budget.

 

3.0       Main Report

 

            Key Issues

 

3.1       In 2019, the Your Freedom and Ours project started working on the Polish Wings Heritage Trail, bringing the forgotten history of the Polish Airmen in Northern Ireland to life in the form of an educational trail available online and physically to the wider public.

 

3.2       This year, to mark the centenary of Northern Ireland, as well as, to celebrate the relationship between the Polish and the Northern Irish communities, they propose to organise a 2 day visit in August by the Polish Heritage Flight to Northern Ireland with a ground event at the Newtownards airfield (subject to restrictions) and a flypast over several locations related to the history of the Polish Airmen in Northern Ireland. The Polish Heritage Flight is a historical aircraft collection based in Duxford, flying the Hurricane and the Spitfire in the Second World War Polish Air Force markings. During the visit, the PHF will provide an aerial display over Belfast including the City Airport, Milltown Cemetery also flying over South, East and North Belfast. This display will be visible to thousands of spectators around Belfast.

 

3.3       Prior to the visit, they also propose delivering a series of talks explaining the history of the Polish Air Force in the Second World War and Northern Ireland. This series will be available to local communities either face-to-face or online. Such an approach would allow the project to explain the historical connection between NI and Poland and foster relationships with the Polish community living in Belfast today.

 

3.4       To make the whole project successful, a partnership was formed between the For Your Freedom and Ours project, the Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Belfast, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough, Ards and North Down Borough and Lisburn and Castlereagh City Councils. All the mentioned above parties have agreed to support the programme and to contribute to the budget.

 

3.5  ...  view the full minutes text for item 29.

30.

Equality and Diversity - Equality Screening and Rural Needs Outcome Report – Quarter 4 2020-21 pdf icon PDF 233 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to note the contents of a report which provided a summary of equality screenings and rural needs impact assessments for the period from January to March, 2021.

 

31.

Minutes of the Meeting of the Shared City Partnership pdf icon PDF 174 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

            The members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to note the minutes of the meeting of the Shared City Partnership of 10th May, including the recommendations:

 

                             i          that the Partnership receive at its next meeting a presentation from Blu Zebra on the draft report “The Council’s Covid Response in Lockdown One – Making Sure No One Was Left Behind”; and

 

                            ii          to note that the Partnership took part in a facilitated discussion on sectarianism within the City and that the outcome of that discussion would be brought to the next meeting of the Shared City Partnership for endorsement and then to the Strategic Policy and Resources Committee.

 

32.

Operational Issues

33.

Minutes of the Meeting of the Party Group Leaders' Consultative Forum pdf icon PDF 385 KB

Minutes:

34.

Minutes of the Meeting of the Social Policy Working Group pdf icon PDF 210 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to note the minutes of the meeting of the Social Policy Working Group of 27th April.

 

35.

Minutes of the Meeting of the Customer Focus Working Group pdf icon PDF 137 KB

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommend that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to note the minutes of the meeting of the Customer Focus Working Group of 21st April.

 

36.

Requests for Use of the City Hall and the Provision of Hospitality pdf icon PDF 145 KB

Additional documents:

37.

Issues Raised in Advance by Members

38.

Belfast City Council to join the Crohn's and Colitis UK 'Invisible Disability Employer Scheme'

(Councillor McMullan to raise)

Minutes:

            The Members of the Committee agreed to recommended that, in accordance with the Council decision of 4th May, the Chief Executive exercise her delegated authority to accede to a request from Councillor McMullan that the Council join the Crohn's and Colitis UK 'Invisible Disability Employer Scheme'.